John Paul Pet spa day and giveaway!

Living in the rainy Pacific Northwest, keeping white dogs clean is an uphill battle. Especially since we’ve moved to the country and they have more places to get dirty. That is why I was excited when John Paul Pet contacted me regarding their Grooming Pet Care 3-Pack. Surely my girls could do with a spa day!

 John Paul Pet spa day and giveaway!

Wait, isn’t John Paul a human product line?

You wondered why it sounded familiar, right? Yes, John Paul DeJoria, is a co-founder of the well known John Paul Mitchell Systems hair care line. And over 30 years ago, DeJoria led the pack, so to speak, by being the first hair care brand to publicly oppose animal testing of their products. Flash forward to 2005, and those same humane principles led to the creation of John Paul Pet, a line of ethical grooming and hygiene products for dogs, cats, and even horses!

“With more than 30 years in the professional salon business, we know what it takes to keep hair and skin healthy. And, the same experience applies to our animal companions. Just as you care what goes into your pet’s food; it’s equally important to care about what goes on their coat and skin.”  John Paul Pet

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Why do girl dogs hump?

girl dog humping Why do girl dogs hump?

photo credit: TimmyGUNZ via photopin cc

There is no demure way to put this. My petite flower Izzie is a dog that likes to hump other dogs. She has been doing this for years, and no amount of correction seems to deter her from this apparently fun activity. Thank goodness her enjoyment of mounting other dogs has not extended to humping human legs, but it’s embarrassing enough when it’s done to another dog, especially in public.

So, why does a girl dog hump other dogs and/or animate or inanimate objects? Here’s what I found out.

Expression of Sexuality. An unaltered (not spayed) dog may hump on things as an expression of her sexuality. I’ve seen chicks in a bar act like this, but didn’t really know dogs expressed their sexuality so blatantly. At any rate, Izzie has been spayed, so this is not the cause.

Dominance. Humping another dog may equate to “I’m the boss of you.” Hmm…this is right in her wheelhouse.

Playing. Sometimes when playing, humping can be an attention-getter (I’ll say!) – especially when a dog has less than wonderful social manners (oh, you noticed?). This can extend to humping toys, furniture and the like. To be honest, I’d almost rather Izzie humped a toy than her sister Maddie.

Sensory overload. If a dog is feeling overwhelmed, with, you know, all the feelings, it may hump. These feelings can include feeling confused, frustrated, anxious, etc. Glad people don’t do this, it would make for awkward lines at the DMV. Or would it?

dog hump doll 150x150 Why do girl dogs hump?And in my research on this topic, I discovered that people in the deep recesses of the internet have a soft spot for Spot trying to mount things. So much so, that there was apparently a dog sex doll on the market at one point (pictured). None of the links to the site work, so I’m assuming it wasn’t a big seller.

So, truth time, does your dog like to mount things? Sound off with your most embarrassing stories in the comments!

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The DoggyDoc is in – 24/7!

DoggyDoc 168x300 The DoggyDoc is in   24/7!I think it’s safe to say many of us have taken to the internet to enter in our variety of aches and pains on a site like WebMD, right? We read what it has to say (hopefully it didn’t scare the bajeezus out of us) and then proceed from there, armed with knowledge when we contact the appropriate professional. But have you ever tried something like that for your pup?

Now with the DoggyDoc app, the doctor is IN. 24/7. On your iOS or Android device.

With DoggyDoc, you can enter in your pet’s specific information, choose from a list of possible issues, and make an informed decision from there.

I tried out the DoggyDoc iOS app for a paw issue Maddie is having and it went a little bit like this…

Using DoggyDoc

To start using DoggyDoc, you enter your dog’s breed. There were many to choose from! Next, you enter other details about your dog like its gender, age, whether it has been altered, and whether it’s current on its recommended vaccinations. DoggyDoc will remember these details for the next time you open the app, so if you’re looking up information for another dog, make sure you change the data.

 The DoggyDoc is in   24/7!

Next, you indicate the area of your dog’s body where it’s experiencing a possible issue. You can choose either inner or outer symptoms. For Maddie, I clicked to find out about her right forepaw.

The next step gives you possible symptoms for the area of the dog’s body you clicked in the prior step. For Maddie I clicked on the symptoms of reddening of skin between paws, and paw swelling. If you have a question on what any of the symptoms might mean, a click on the “i” button next to the symptom brings up a more complete description of the symptom. Additionally, the bar on the bottom of the app makes it extremely easy to navigate back to prior information entered, or to proceed forward. [Read more…]

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My dog is an introvert

It was only recently that I learned, and subsequently identified with, the term introvert for my own benefit. Sure, I’d heard the term thrown around, and I assumed an introvert was sort of a homebody, and someone that didn’t necessarily like other people. Turns out this couldn’t be more untrue. An introvert can be very social, can even be the life of the party when they deem it necessary, they just aren’t energized by it. Exactly, I thought! Instead, an introvert can feel drained by forcing themselves to be “on,” and will need time alone to themselves to re-energize.

Just like my dog.

 My dog is an introvert

It isn’t any secret that Izzie wasn’t properly socialized. At the time, nearly eight years ago, I thought if you had another dog, your dog would become social with that dog. Yep, I completely missed the mark on what socialization meant for a dog. And the dog she had for company was sort of mental, so that helped even less. Flash forward many years, and Izzie is a dog that is fearful in situations she doesn’t know, doesn’t really enjoy the company of many other dogs, and feels out of sorts unless she is in her comfort zone of familiarity. That comfort zone includes being left to her own devices, and only playing with her younger sister when the mood strikes.

So, what now?

Is Izzie’s need to keep to herself a bad thing? Not really.

Do I need her to be the life of the party at the dog park? Not at all.

Does she need socialization to get over her fears? Absolutely.

So, while respecting her individuality as a dog that prefers the company of herself (plus pillows), I’ve been slowly working with her on her socialization. Slowly has been the keyword. She still doesn’t like leaving her comfort zone. She still is not quite sure why she should have to be out and about. And although she loses her mind with excitement the second you mention going somewhere in the car, she pants incessantly the entire trip.

Realizing my dog is introverted has made me realize that training works best when it’s done in short increments of time, and gives her time to “recharge” afterwards on her own. I’ve also learned that socialization and social aren’t necessarily the same thing. I want and need her to be acceptable around others (socialized), but she doesn’t have to love and seek out the company of others (social).

Have you had luck with training an introverted dog?

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Treat with a reason: Dynamo Dog Functional Treats from Cloud Star

Not all treats are created equal. The goal for most treats is that they taste good to your pup, and contain ingredients you find appropriate for your dog. But that doesn’t mean you can go shoving whatever tastes good in your dog’s mouth, any more than you should do that for yourself, right? However, what if the treat served a purpose, other than empty calories? Cloud Star’s line of Dynamo Dog Functional Treats accomplish exactly this. They’re a treat with a reason!

Glad that the treats weren’t just empty calories, we (well, Izzie and Maddie) decided to take the Dynamo Dog Functional Treat product line for a spin, so to speak.

What’s “functional” about them?

First of all, let me say that for each variety of the Dynamo Dog Functional Treat line, the treats are free of grain, gluten, wheat, corn, soy, artificial colors, artificial flavors, and byproducts, plus are made in the USA. Being a dog mom that watches what her dogs are allowed to eat, I give this a big appreciative thumbs up.

Izzie and Maddie tried all three “functions” of the functional treats:

  • Tummy – for daily support of digestive health – with pumpkin, ginger, and added probiotics
  • Skin & Coat – for daily support of healthy skin and shiny coat – with salmon and added Vitamin E
  • Hip & Joint – for daily support of healthy joint function – with bacon & cheese, or with chicken, plus added Glucosamine HCL and Chondroitin Sulfate

 Treat with a reason: Dynamo Dog Functional Treats from Cloud Star

Because the treats are nutraceutical in nature, each bag clearly provides feeding instructions for your dog based on their weight. My girls were glad to learn the recommended “dosing” was daily, athough the recommended “dosage” was half of one treat each. The soft treats easily split in half (or even smaller) for the purpose of sharing with two eager dogs.

Our Experience

When we moved last month, Maddie was having a bit of tummy trouble. I knew from prior experience that pumpkin and ginger were good ingredients to calm a dog’s stomach. So I was pleased to try her on the Tummy treats. With added probiotics, pumpkin, and ginger, I knew those ingredients would be beneficial to her condition, and they were. 

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